MALT Lymphoma

After many years of H.pylori infection a cancer can develop in the stomach. This is particularly common in Latin America and Asia (esp. Japan). It is believed that lifelong inflammation of the stomach lining causes low acidity which then allows carcinogens to be active in the stomach. These then cause stem cells (part of the healing process) to mutate and become cancer cells.

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Helico_expert
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Re: MALT Lymphoma

Post by Helico_expert » Mon Nov 11, 2019 10:08 am

Here is a little bit more information to your Fundus atrophic question.

Picture below is the most current strategy in predicting the risk of gastric cancer - OLGA system.
OLGA-staging-system-of-gastric-cancer-risk.png

As for HCL tablet treatment on Atrophic Gastritis problem. This is really an uncharted territory. Too little study (or none) actually shown its benefit. So I am not sure if it helps.

Helico_expert
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Re: MALT Lymphoma

Post by Helico_expert » Tue Nov 12, 2019 7:56 pm

Just want to share this recently published paper here in regards to the 250 mg Vitamin C.
H pylori treatment and vitamin supplementation were also associated with a statistically significantly reduced incidence of gastric cancer.
For vitamin supplementation (30 November 1995 to 31 March 2003), participants received one capsule of 250 mg vitamin C, 100 IU vitamin E, and 37.5 μg selenium (n=1677) or a look alike placebo capsule (n=1688) twice daily for 7.3 years.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6737461/

ankiwo72
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Re: MALT Lymphoma

Post by ankiwo72 » Wed Nov 13, 2019 2:25 am

Helico_expert wrote:
Wed Apr 24, 2019 9:12 am
There is no guideline to prevent H. pylori infection.
Usually the route of transmission is via kissing or unhygienic toilets.
Some people believes yoru can catch H. pylori from polluted water source, which I do not believe.
If H. Pylori does not live in/colonize the oral cavity, how can it be transmitted through kissing?

Helico_expert
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Re: MALT Lymphoma

Post by Helico_expert » Wed Nov 13, 2019 9:10 am

if you brushed your teeth every morning and night, there will be no H. pylori in the oral cavity.
That's why transmission in the modern society is very low.
We have seen so many married couples, decades living together, not infecting each other.

H. pylori can present in the mouth if
1. the oral hygiene is poor
2. severe reflux symptom
3. vomit

All the above can also happen in the modern society, but in a lower frequency.
They happen more frequently in the rural area or community with lower social status.

ankiwo72
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Re: MALT Lymphoma

Post by ankiwo72 » Thu Nov 14, 2019 2:48 am

Helico_expert wrote:
Wed Nov 13, 2019 9:10 am
if you brushed your teeth every morning and night, there will be no H. pylori in the oral cavity.
That's why transmission in the modern society is very low.
We have seen so many married couples, decades living together, not infecting each other.

H. pylori can present in the mouth if
1. the oral hygiene is poor
2. severe reflux symptom
3. vomit

All the above can also happen in the modern society, but in a lower frequency.
They happen more frequently in the rural area or community with lower social status.
Moderator,

Can you please feel free to move this portion of the thread to another section if appropriate?

I am getting extensive dental work done (replacing old, cracked crowns, etc.) and my husband also has extensive periodontal work being done and his breath smells bad even after brushing (it has gotten worse recently). At one time he had H.Pylori but got treated with me, and retested at least 2 or 3 times to make me happy - his results remained negative afterward but mine stayed positive (very unfair!!) Last test he took was about a year ago. I recently completed my 6th or 7th treatment due to prior treatment failures (I've posted on this forum about this not too long ago). I go for my next breath test a week from today to see if it has been eradicated (I am simultaneously hopeful and skeptical) and then endoscopy scheduled the week after that (5 weeks post-treatment).

My three questions are:
- Should I take a chance and kiss my husband on the mouth after all this time (it's been a very long time and I miss it), not knowing what his halitosis is caused by?
- Might getting oral surgery adversely affect the bacterial load after treatment and/or transmit anything to my husband that may be lurking in my mouth?
- Is 4 weeks post-treatment long enough for breath test to be accurate (usually I go after 6 weeks), and is 5 weeks after treatment long enough for endoscopy results to be accurate?

Thanks!

Helico_expert
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Re: MALT Lymphoma

Post by Helico_expert » Thu Nov 14, 2019 10:37 am

Can you kiss your husband?
if you brushed your teeth in the morning and after meal, then I think you can safely kiss your husband. The chance of you infecting your husband is low.

halitosis, what can you do about it?
You can get your husband to get a course of metronidazole. That will get rid of the bugs that create the odor. However, the bugs may come back after a while. It could be 2 months or 4 months or longer. Can try to maintain the oral hygiene by brushing teeth and gargle with mouth wash solution after the course of metronidazole. That can prevent the bad bacteria coming back.

How long should you wait to get follow up breath test?
4 weeks post-treatment is good enough. But the longer the better. it will be the same for endoscopy.

ankiwo72
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Re: MALT Lymphoma

Post by ankiwo72 » Sat Nov 16, 2019 5:15 am

Thank you!

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